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For years, my wife and I had a pretty simple arrangement in the case of a home invasion. We’d both grab our guns and flashlights from the nightstand, dial the police, and stay put. But then, we moved out of our apartment and bought a house.

Formulating a Family Home Defense Plan

Formulating a Family Home Defense PlanFor years, my wife and I had a pretty simple arrangement in the case of a home invasion. We’d both grab our guns and flashlights from the nightstand, dial the police, and stay put. But then, we moved out of our apartment and bought a house. My brother came to live with us. We had a baby. Our simple plan needed modifying. Make sure you’re all on the same page. First, the adults sat down and discussed what the best course of action would be should something go bump in the night. We realized that three armed adults moving through the house to confront a possible intruder might pose more of a danger to one another than the intruder would. We’d have to determine where everyone was going to be. So we considered the floor plan of the house, what natural choke points existed, and decided who would go where if the alarms went off. Sometimes the best plan is the simplest. We arrived at the conclusion that it would be best if my brother would stay put in his room, and only leave it if we called to him. My wife and I, coming from the same room, would be better able to coordinate our movements. She would head to my daughter’s room, and I would guard the hallway, the only approach from the rest of the house. Simple, but effective. Detailed plans are the first to derail in times of stress or panic. Consider the costs. An underlying principle of home defense you and your family members should remember before and after creating your home-defense plan is this: There’s no material object worth killing or dying over. If someone has broken in and is stealing your things, call the police and wait it out. Your insurance will cover anything that gets stolen, and even if it doesn’t, you’ll still come out ahead by not having to defend yourself in court for shooting the intruder. Always consider the ratio between cost and benefit: In the case of stopping a violent invasion, the cost may be expensive and stressful litigation later, but the benefit is preserving your life and the lives of your family members. Totally worthwhile. In the case of a nonviolent break-in, the cost remains the same, but the only benefit is protecting your possessions. Do you have an established home-defense plan? Opening photo courtesy of personaldefenseworld.com.

[Review] Chiappa Rhino 40DS: Current Favorite Revolver

[Review] Chiappa Rhino 40DS: Current Favorite Revolver

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Do you know one type of gun that’s remained untouched in an era of innovation? The revolver . And it’s time we talk about one of the coolest, best shooting, and innovative revolvers on the market – the Chiappa Rhino! Chiappa Rhino Lots of companies are still producing normal revolvers, for sure. Colt even brought back a few, and Kimber introduced one, on top of all the offerings from S&W, Ruger, Taurus, and more. But…what is different about them? Ruger, Taurus, and S&W all introduced revolvers using polymer to create lightweight designs. Charter made a neat system for automatic, rimless rounds that doesn’t require a moon clip. That’s it, except for one little company out of Italy called Chiappa. They took the six gun and employed a little bit of creativity to it. Chiappa employed a fella named Emilio Ghisoni, and he teamed up with another guy named Antonio Cudazzo to design something truly unique. Emilio had a refreshing habit of building ultra-excellent revolver, starting with forgotten Mateba Auto revolver, a semi-automatic revolver. Meteba-Auto-Revolver The Rhino shares a lot in common with the Mateba, but it’s not a semi-automatic gun. These two Italian designers gifted us with what’s become one of the coolest guns in decades, the Chiappa Rhino. The Rhino is a fascinating revolver. What it does differently from a traditional revolver is position the barrel in alignment with the lowermost chamber of the cylinder. Most revolvers position the barrel in line with the topmost chamber of a cylinder, and they always have. The Rhino’s barrel is placed so low for a reason, and it doesn’t just look cool it’s functional. It’s All About That Bore Axis. We hear a lot of garbage about bore axis in the firearms industry. If you want to make fun of SIG Sauer, then point out “How high” their bore axis is. Then you can feel smug on Facebook. Smug Sea Lion is smug Bore axis in automatic handguns, in standard calibers like 9mm, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP is a joke. People like to claim that the bore axis of a gun like the SIG will cause more muzzle rise and muzzle flip. Does it? Yep, it sure does, but in these cartridges it’s infinitesimal. If I drew you a pie chart of all the reasons why people cannot shoot quickly and accurately bore axis wouldn’t even be mentioned. High and low bore axis On an automatic gun it’s often not low enough to matter, and the cartridges these guns fire do not create a whole lot of recoil and muzzle rise in the first place. The only automatic that I can think of that has found a way to make the bore axis low enough to matter is the Laugo Alien. Sorry, that’s my bore axis rant. I used to fall for the same hoopla. However, a revolver allows the barrel to sit much lower and can be chambered in much more powerful rounds like the .357 Magnum. This is where we see the significant difference in bore axis. The Chiappa Rhino has hardly any muzzle flip. Dat low bore Even when loaded with full powered .357 Magnums the Chiappa hardly moves. Don’t be mistaken, you still feel the recoil, but there is hardly any muzzle rise. You can keep the sites on target without much difficulty. This low bore axis makes the gun incredibly comfortable to shoot, and it’s hard to describe it until you try it. It is a brilliant design. On to the Review Now that we’ve addressed the Rhino in the room that is the oddball design we can talk about the Rhino a little more in depth. The Rhino comes in a variety of sizes with model numbers that express the barrel length. Chiappa Rhinos 200DS and 40DS The models include the 20D, (Double action only) 20DS, the 30DS the 40DS, the 50DS and the 60DS with 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6-inch barrels respectively. The model we are reviewing is the 40DS in .357 Magnum. The gun also comes in 9mm and .40 S&W. The Rhino’s Unique Edge Outside of the lower barrel height the Chiappa Rhino 40DS sports a Picatinny rail for attaching lights or lasers. Rails are a very rare feature for revolvers. The 60DS even has a small rail for attaching an optic. Lots of pistol red dots in our Best Pistol Red Dot review! The interesting design features don’t end there. The “hammer” for example is not a hammer. It doesn’t move as you fire the gun. This hammer appearing thingy is a hammer-cocking device that you can thumb the gun into single action mode with. The device will then go back to what appears to be an uncocked position. A red indicator sticks up when the gun is cocked into single action mode. Positioned behind the ‘hammer’ is a lever that releases the cylinder and makes it easy to open the cylinder with one hand. Cylinder flats Additionally, to reduce the profile of the gun the cylinder is hexagonal and not round like a traditional revolver. The sights are fully adjustable, and there are a variety of sight options out there. These sights are blacked out in the rear, and the front is a red fiber optic sights. The grip is wood, which is somewhat cool on such a modern revolver. Adjustable rear sight "The Chiappa Rhino" 40DS is a big gun but looks bulkier than it is. The 40DS weighs 1.87 pounds, which makes it lighter than most of the 4-inch revolver competition out there. The weapon has a 4-inch barrel and is 8.5 inches overall. Shiny fiber optic front sight Hitting the Range The Rhino 40DS is a fun gun to shoot. It looks cool, and it’s very comfortable. As I mentioned above the weapon has minimal muzzle rise and its perfectly pleasant to shoot with .357 Magnums. It can also handle .38 Special and with .38 special loads its perfect for teaching new shooters how to handle a revolver. .38 Special vs .357 Magnum The red fiber optic front sight is very easy to pick up and small enough to avoid covering small targets at longer ranges. This sight makes it easy to reach out and touch a target. Speaking of, the gun is plenty accurate for shooting out to 35 yards on smaller targets. On man-sized targets, the sky is the limit, as is your skill level. Out to 75 yards, I bet you won’t have issues hitting a man-sized target especially if you cock the weapon into single action mode. The trigger is nice, nothing super special in terms of revolvers, but more than adequate. The double action is more impressive than the single action. The double action is heavy, but it feels shorter than you’d expect. The single action is a solid meh, nothing special compared to most revolvers. If this weapon is going to serve a defensive role the double action is much more important than the single action. As a revolver, the Rhino is reliable as a gun can be. It ignites ammo both cheap and pricey, including Tula .357 Magnums and their overly hard primers. I will say the biggest downside, in my opinion, is the gun’s grip. It looks nice, it points nicely, but it doesn’t feel my hand very well. It’s just too small for me. I do have big hands, and I think a bigger grip would benefit me. The grip is also excessively smooth and feels like it wants to slide around in my hand. If it wasn’t for the low bore axis, the Rhino 40DS has I feel like it requires me to shift grips every few shots. Best Chiappa Rhino Aftermarket Upgrades The aftermarket for the Chiappa Rhino is somewhat small. There are some holsters out there, some custom speed loaders, and speed strips will always work with the Rhino. In terms of what I would choose for my Rhino given its limited market, I would go with the following. 1. Galco Combat Master "Galco Combat Master" for Chiappa Rhino 77 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 77 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing While the Rhino is a revolver of the future, it’s still a revolver, and a leather holster is a great way to carry your gun. This model is made for the 40DS and is an OWB holster for concealed carry. The Combat Master clings tight to your body and is a pancake design. "The Combat Master" is a little boomerish, but a revolver deserves leather and always will. 2. Safariland J-R4C Comp 2 Speed loader (Ruger Security Six version) Safariland J-R4C COMP II Speedloader 11 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 11 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing There are some nice aluminum custom Rhino speed loaders out there, but they are not exactly cheap. The J-R4C is an injection molded design and is very affordable. The J-R4C is made for various guns, but the models compatible with the Ruger Security Six is compatible with the Rhino. 3. Snap Cap .357 Magnum Rounds A-ZOOM .357 Magnum Precision Snap Caps 15 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 15 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Like mag changes if you are going to carry a reload you best know how to use it. It’s not safe to practice with live ammo, so spend a few bucks and buy some Snap Caps. These are perfect for practicing those reloads safely and realistically. 4. Bianchi Speed Strips Bianchi Speed Strip Pair for .38/.357 Caliber 7 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 7 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Bianchi made the original Speed Strip for revolvers and continue to do so. The "Bianchi Speed Strips" are designed to make carrying reload simpler than a speed loader. Speed strips are flat and fit easier in pockets and still allows you to carry six rounds. They are slower and do require more practice to use efficiently. They do allow you to top off your revolver should you only fire a round or two in self-defense. By the Numbers Reliability 5/5 It’s a flipping revolver. It’s either a 5 or a 1, and there is no in-between! It’s certainly not ammo or primer picky, and it goes bang when you pull the trigger. The cylinder always opens, the hammer still cocks, and it all just works. Accuracy 4/5 The gun is plenty accurate, and you can reach out and touch a target. The gun points very well, the sights are small but easy to see, and the rear sight is adjustable. I knocked one point off just because the single action is very meh. The Rhino is not a cheap revolver, and I’d prefer a crisper SA design. Ergonomics 4/5 The gun is plenty ergonomic. The controls are well thought out, and you can tell the design is from a shooter for shooters. Note the release lever and cocking hammer The hexagon cylinder makes it easy to grip when reloading with a speed loader, the hammer cocking device is easy to reach, and of course, the cylinder release is perfectly placed. It loses one point for the smallish grip in my gorilla hands. Looks 5/5 I mean c’ mon, this thing is cool as hell. There are a few reasons why it ends up in movies like Ghost in the Shell, Suicide Squad, and Total Recall. It looks like it stepped out of the pages of a comic book and I can’t help but love it. Customization 2/5 There isn’t much you can do, you can change the grips, add a light maybe, and that is about it. It gets two because of that rail and how rare a rail is on revolvers. Bang for your Buck 3/5 This is a pricey revolver, with the average price of the 40Ds being around 800 bucks it’s a tough sell. At least to me, it is. For 800 bucks and some change, you can get a 686 Plus Performance Center revolver with more rounds, a better trigger, and comparative sights. Overall 4/5 Overall this is one of my favorite revolvers. It’s not perfect, but it is just so freakin’ cool. It’s fun to shoot, easy to hit your target with, and the futuristic look and design make it a unique experience. Parting Thoughts and Final Shots The Chiappa Rhino is an ultra-cool gun. As far as revolvers go, it’s tough to take the concept and improve upon it, but two Italian designers managed to find a way. The Rhino is also more than just a gimmick. Plenty of guns come out with a gimmicky feature and rely solely on that feature. The problem is they lose focus on how to make a good gun. The Rhino is a good gun. It’s more than just a low barrel profile. The gun features excellent controls and ergonomics, a decent trigger, and several innovations that leave most revolvers in the dust. The Rhino isn’t perfect, but I’ll be damned if it isn’t my current favorite revolver. What’s your take on the Rhino? Is it cool enough to enter your collection?  Otherwise check out our other favorites in Best .357 Magnum Revolvers .

Weird Gun Wednesday: Heckler&Koch P7M8

Weird Gun Wednesday: Heckler&Koch P7M8

The Heckler &; Koch P7M8 is a gun that can’t be mistaken for anything else once you’ve seen it. When you say the name Heckler & Koch, several iconic guns come to mind immediately, covering a wide range of weapons systems. The G3 assault rifle was revolutionary when it came out in 1959, introducing the world to roller-lock-style weapons. The MP5 submachine gun is possibly one of the most recognizable and bestselling weapons of the last 40 years for law enforcement anywhere on earth. And the MK23 series of pistols , which were first delivered to USSOCOM shortly after H&K was awarded a production contract in June 1995, marked the first time H&K had been awarded a contract for making handguns for the U.S. military. The Heckler & Koch P7M8 pistol, chambered in 9x19mm (9mm Luger or Parabellum), was at one time unsuccessfully marketed to the United States Department of Defense during the hunt for a replacement of the 1911 combat pistol in the early 1980s. One glance at the P7M8, and you can tell it certainly looks different than more well-known pistols. The slide and barrel sit much lower on the frame than, say, a Beretta 92 series or a Ruger P95 pistol. In the interest of full disclosure, I will say that this is my wife’s pistol—a gift from her father—and I despise this gun with everything in my being. It seems like every time I take it out with her to shoot it, someone sees it and wants to ask questions about it. The P7M8 is getting harder and harder to find nowadays, driving the cost of one in good condition to anywhere from $1500 to $2200. I’m sure when Heckler & Koch made this design, they had no idea how polarizing it would be. There seems to be no middle ground; people either love or despise this pistol. I am in the latter of the two camps. I’m going to go out on a limb and say that most of that division of feelings stems from the “squeeze grip” design on the front strap of the gun. This quote from Wikipedia best sums up the mechanism as a whole: Squeezing the cocking lever with a force of 70 N (15.7 lb f ) cocks the firing pin. Once fully depressed, only two pounds of force are required to keep the weapon cocked. The weapon is then fired by pressing the single stage trigger rated at approximately 20 N (4.5 lb f ). As long as the lever is depressed, the weapon fires like any other semi-automatic pistol. If the lever is released, the weapon is immediately de-cocked and rendered safe. It might have been revolutionary when it was made in 1978, but I personally find it cumbersome and awkward. It makes you keep constant pressure on the grips to keep the gun cocked, so if you tend to limp-wrist your shots, you will end up cocking and uncocking your pistol inadvertently. That said, I’d imagine since it was designed for law enforcement, if drawn in the line of duty, the massive amounts of adrenaline in your body would make squeezing that 15.7 pounds of force seem like nothing at all. If you stop to consider when this gun was produced, there are several features that set it apart from most of its peers of the time. It featured a truly ambidextrous safety, and a cocking indicator that protruded from the rear of the pistol when the gun was cocked. Close up of cocking indicator As odd as the P7M8 is to grip, the trigger is butter smooth. I’m not a mechanical engineer, and I have no idea what kind of voodoo magic they put in this at the Oberdorf H&K factory, but it’s an awesome trigger indeed. Not great enough to make me want to become a fan of the pistol, but it’s noteworthy. I’m a huge fan of firearms in general, and I tend to read a lot about them, but with all my knowledge, there are still a lot of things about this pistol that shocked me. Heckler & Koch used a delayed-action blowback system ( below ) for their P7—think of a hybrid pistol/piston-AR15 setup. I was oblivious to any design like this until I began to read about it for this article. The P7 also uses a polygonal rifling system, which, if you are used to looking at traditional land-and-groove-style rifling, might make you think the pistol has been “shot-out”—meaning no rifling remains. That’s not the case; look at the differences below . You can see in the diagrams what I mean when I say the P7 has a hybrid piston-AR15/pistol system. The idea that this concept was around for this long in this pistol family before it made its way into rifles is puzzling. I would have expected engineers to try it on other pistols or weapons systems, but the lackluster sales in North America might have put this entire line of thought on the back burner, especially after it was rejected early on in the U.S. Department of Defense trials in the early 1980s. The hefty price tag during its production run from 1978 until 2008 definitely hurt sales; combine that with the emerging flood of U.S.-built 9mm pistols during that time and it’s not hard to see the end result. Another drawback to the P7M8 that likely hurt its chances at success: Compared to its domestically produced, typically high-capacity competition, the P7 came equipped with an eight-round single-stack magazine. Even today, with the gun having been produced for 30 years, magazines are hard to find and expensive compared to anything else in its class. Polygonal Rifling Polygonal rifling was first proposed in 1853 by a British engineer and entrepreneur for barrels on cannons. Today, there are six major pistol companies that still use polygonal rifling instead of traditional rifling. They are Heckler & Koch , Tanfoglio , Kahr Arms , Glock , Magnum Research , and CZ-USA . Fans of polygonal barrels have touted many ways it’s superior to traditional rifling. Those reasons include: Not compromising the barrel’s thickness in the area of each groove as with traditional rifling Providing a better gas seal around the projectile Lesser chance of projectile deformation Reduced fouling and build up of debris in barrel Prolonged barrel life I’m skeptical of the claims made by the manufacturers of pistols with polygonal barrels; they have a vested interest in touting the “advancements” in the designs of their products and are trying to gets sales in any legal way they can. They also have shareholders who want good quarterly profit reports, high stock values, and increased market share. That’s not to say they aren’t well-made pistols, I just prefer what I carry and shoot. This isn’t the first or the last unique pattern of weapon Heckler & Koch has created. Some of these have been well received by the shooting community like the Universal Self Loading Pistol, or USP as we now know it. Others like the P7M8 or the HK-4 never caught traction. So there you have it: a quick rundown and review of the Heckler & Koch P7M8 pistol chambered in 9mm. It was often overlooked when it first came out in favor of the “wonder nines” like the Glock family of pistols, but it served with distinction with the New Jersey State Police and the U.S. National Park Police Department . Hope you enjoyed our quick look at a very unique and odd pistol, be sure the check back often, like us on Facebook and help spread the word the The Arms Guide is back in business. Thanks, -Rick

Gun Culture Goes Mainstream: Gun Podcasts

Gun Culture Goes Mainstream: Gun Podcasts

New Media Gun guys and gals have long been served via new media outlets. You Tube gun channels abound, gun guy/gal websites are widely available, and even traditional in-print publications seem to be more widely accepted in the gun world than in other cultural subsets. Podcasts However, the podcast world has been woefully void of pro-gun voices. Sure, there were the conservative talk radio crossover shows, but virtually no gun-oriented content existed on iTunes. That was a shame because podcasts offer a quickly growing media outlet that has been leveraged in almost every other imaginable industry sector. It would be great to see the gun culture be known as early adopters and innovators rather than Johnny-come-latelies. A Positive Shift Fortunately there has been a recent shift! This shift deserves our support. Let me point you to a few gun-friendly podcasts that are not only growing in popularity but also point to the potential for gun culture voices to be heard more readily within mainstream conversations. That’s right ladies and gents, I’m suggesting that anyone who feels prone to lurking in back allies should come out into the light of day. Gun Podcasts Talking Lead Talking Lead has been around for a while (more than 200 episodes), and they have been regulars at You Tube gun channel events over the past few years. They tend to talk a lot about firearms products. Felt Recoil Felt Recoil is a newer podcast that is gaining traction quickly. They talk about a bit broader range of topics but are deeply rooted in the gun culture. I sat down with the guys from the Felt Recoil podcast at the NRA show this year. Kris Vermilion was a talk radio host in a former life, and now works full-time in the firearms industry. I predict this moonlighting gig will continue to grow. Practically Tactical The Practically Tactical Show discusses training and applied gear quite a bit. They regularly host Steve Fisher of Sentinel Concepts and Trek from MDFI. Jeff Bloovman of Armed Dynamics is a co-host of the show. Cam and Co from NRA Radio With the NRA backing this show, it is one of the largest gun-related podcasts currently. As you might expect, this show has a freedom, political, and legal orientation, but the topics cover a wide range of subjects. If you listen to podcasts in your commute, while mowing the lawn, working out, or some other activity, I would highly encourage you to listen to these four gun podcasts. Downloads turn into dollars and when you spend your time in areas related to the gun culture, you can be sure to find more content that you enjoy down the road!

The Ruger 10-22 Rifle: The Quintessential Survival Rifle

The number designation 10-22 has universally become synonymous with America’s most popular rimfire rifle.  It is perhaps the most prolific semi-auto rifle firing the venerable .22 long rifle rimmed cartridge ever to be manufactured in this country.  There is little doubt this very capable .22 rifle is a perennial favorite among shooters.  This admiration, too, is carried on by many preppers and survivalists as a most basic firearm for a SHTF arsenal. The gun manufacturer Sturm, Ruger and Company first introduced the 10-22 Ruger rifle in 1964.  Since then, it has sold literally millions in its same basic configuration, though it has seen some upgrade modifications, and has been offered in a wide variety of models and versions. The 10-22 is ideal for every rimfire application including informal plinking at tin cans, safe targets of opportunity, small game hunting, and even formal rimfire related action shooting events.  Survivalists even argue its use for close quarter’s defensive work if needed. Quick Navigation The Basic Specifications Ruger 10-22 Model Variations The Ruger 10-22 Charger The Ruger SR-22 A Plethora of 10- 22 Aftermarket Accessories "The Basic Specifications" The initial model 10-22 for which the base model remains essentially the same includes Ruger’s legendary semi-auto rifle action.  Fed from a detachable 10-round rotary magazine that drops from below the action out of the stock, its reliability in feeding is renowned.  The rifle just simply, rarely, ever fails to feed and function when using quality ammunition.  It can function virtually indefinitely even when black dirty with powder and bullet fowling. The cold hammer-forged barrel comes standard in an 18.5 inch length with a gold bead front sight and a simple adjustable rear in the base model.  The barrel is locked into the receiver via a Ruger designed 2-screw V-block system.  The rifle’s overall length is 37-inches with a weight of only 5 pounds. It is indeed lightweight, easy to handle, and shoulder for firing.  The length of pull from trigger to buttstock end is 13.5 inches, so the rifle fits nearly every shooter from adult veterans to youth shooters, and lady’s alike.  It is a highly adaptable rifle, easy to tote and quick into action. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA Read Also: Ruger 10/22 Upgrades The standard stock is hardwood finished in a handsome walnut color.  Black synthetic stocks are now available as well.  Ruger 10-22’s come in either alloy steel in a black satin finish or stainless steel with a clear satin finish.  The rifle’s safety is a positive push-button cross bolt manual safety positioned just ahead of the trigger guard. Also ahead of the trigger guard is a bolt hold open slide lever as well as an extended magazine release for easy removal of the flush mounted rotary magazine.  Many “banana” type 25-round magazines are available as well including Ruger’s own fine BX-25 magazine. Ruger 10-22 rifles come standard with an included scope base adapter that handles both Weaver-type and .22 tip-off scope mounts.  The Ruger can handle a wide variety of conventional optics from glass scopes to battery powered red dot sights, to more sophisticated electronic tactical type sights .  This makes the 10-22 very adaptable to a variety of missions. The standard hardwood stocked model with blued steel retails for about $210.  The stainless version with a black synthetic stock goes for roughly $260.  They could be less when sales are shopped a various outlets and used ones occasionally come up for sale at gun shows. Ruger 10-22 Model Variations The Ruger factory now produces 11 model variations of the 10-22 rifle.  By model name these include the Carbine, Sporter, Compact, Tactical with flash suppressor, Tactical with target trigger, heavy contour barrel and bipod, Target with target trigger and heavy contour barrel, and the Takedown.  Several sub-models exist within these main model categories.  For full details, model variations and exact specifications, consult Ruger’s web site www.ruger.com . The Ruger 10-22 Charger Newly designed in 2015 from the original 2007 model, Ruger re-introduced a very unique 10-22 model trade named the Charger.  This is a short-barreled pistol version using the same 10-22 action with a new BX-15 magazine with 15 round capacity.  This pistol version has a 10-inch barrel.  The rear of the pistol sports an AR-15 type A-2 pistol grip.  The overall length of the Charger is 19.25 inches and weighs just over three pounds. The receiver top comes standard with a factory installed Picatinny rail for optics mounting.  The barrel’s muzzle is pre-threaded and security capped for the simple screw on installation of a suppressor.  The cap serves as a thread protector.  The stock of this model is a brown laminate. Brand new for 2015 came the takedown version of the Charger.  This makes for a super compact and concealable pistol package with the Ruger quick take apart design that permits the pistol sections to be quickly taken apart or as quickly assembled.  The laminate stock of the takedown version is a handsome, cool, green mountain coloration. Both the regular and takedown Chargers come supplied with a bipod that affixes to the front sling swivel stud.  The bipod legs are adjustable for height.  This permits steady shooting off the bench or other stationary platforms.  The Charger comes with either a soft carry case or a hard plastic carry case. The Ruger SR-22 I have only seen one of these and the dealer sold it in fifteen minutes before I could secure it.  Eventually the supply lines with fill up, I hope.  The SR-22 is an AR-15 type configured rifle, but built on the 10-22 receiver action.  At a distance you would swear or think this rifle was truly an AR-15. Check Out: The Walking Around Rifle Specs on the SR-22 include a 36-inch overall length, 6.9 pounds, matte black (Or other colors.  I have seen coyote tan.), a flash hider, M-4 type collapsible stock, and front and rear flip up adjustable open sights atop a short front Picatinny rail riser, and a rear Picatinny rail riser.  The rifle retails for roughly $550 if or when you can find one at a gun shop dealer. A Plethora of 10- 22 Aftermarket Accessories If you thought the world of accessories and goodies was crazy for the AR-15 breed of rifles, just check into what is available for the Ruger 10-22s.  If you’re curious, then check out Cheaper Than Dirt as just one example. The list of add-ons is long but it includes for the standard rifles many types of replacement stocks including popular pistol grip tactical type black synthetic stocks as well as the new Magpul Hunter stock.  All kinds of replacement stocks of wood, colored laminates, thumbhole stocks and other configurations are available. Other accessories for the 10-22 includes laser sights, all kinds of magazines including 50-round drums, butt pad extensions, extended magazine releases, hard and soft cases, custom barrels, muzzle brakes, flash hiders, triggers, recoil buffers, magazine speed loaders, scope mounts, rings, and armorers component bench mats.  For example CTD lists 273 separate items for the 10-22.  Let the shopping begin. One other minor sidebar here.  It has been reported, but perhaps just a rumor, that the Takedown standard rifle, and the Takedown Charger’s components can be interchanged creating an impromptu SBR or short barreled rifle, but it could be just a rumor. Here are our favorite accessories for the Ruger 10/22: ACCESSORIES FEATURES #1 Stock #1 Stock Magpul Hunter X-22 Stock for Ruger 10/22 Favorite Stock for Ruger 10/22 Quick and simple to install Compatible with all Ruger 10/22 and accessories Check Price on Brownells.com Check Price on Amazon.com #1 Scope #1 Scope Vortex Optics Crossfire II Favorite Scope for Ruger 10/22 Anti-reflective, bright and clear views Waterproof and fogproof performance Check Price on Brownells.com Check Price on Amazon.com Allen Company Ruger Summit Gun Sling Favorite Sling for Ruger 10/22 Made with lightweight foam. No slip. Swivel test to 300 pounds Check Price on Amazon.com TRUGLO Rimfire Fiber Optic Sight Favorite Sight for Ruger 10/22 CNC machined. Not for carbine barrels. Front diameter is .060" and rear diameter is .035". Check Price on Brownells.com Check Price on Amazon.com ULTECHNOVO Extended Mag Release Favorite Magazine Release Drop in part. Easy to install Speed increase between Mag changes Check Price on Amazon.com Gunsmither 10/22 Bolt Bar and Extractor Tool Favorite Extractor for 10/22 Dual purpose: Bolt Bar and Extractor tool Made in USA Check Price on Amazon.com Handle for .22LR Ruger 10/22 Favorite Bolt Handle for 10/22 Ready-to-go. No gunsmithing needed. Made in USA Check Price on Brownells.com Check Price on Amazon.com The Ruger 10-22 in any configuration demands to be included in any prepper or survivalist weapons cache.  There are few other firearms so universally adaptable to multi-tasking for SHTF purposes.  It may just be a meager .22 long rifle shooter, but its applications are just too suitable to be passed over.  In fact, a prepper ought to have several of them. Save Save Save Save Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: Ruger Charger Takedown 7 Best Ruger 10/22 Accessories and Upgrades for Survival in 2020 Ruger 10/22 Takedown: Survival Rifle Review S&W 15-22 vs Ruger 10/22: Survival Rifle Debate for 2020

Lots of Kiwis Stopping By! Are You Curious About Your New Service Rifle?

Hi New Zealanders. Sight stats indicate a lot more traffic coming from New Zealand. I suspect this is due to your recent military acquisition of the LMT CQB 16 and your curiosity about the AR15 platform. In case some of you out there in Americaland were not aware, LMT recently won the bid for the NZDF weapon replacement program. The LMT CQB16 won a contract for 8000 rifles and beat out several other submissions by Beretta, CZ, Steyr, Colt, Sig, and HK. The LMT CQB 16 For all those individuals in New Zealand curious about their upcoming 2016 rifle, you are receiving a versatile piece of equipment. A 406 mm barrel assembly is a perfect compromise for the 5.56 projectile, and your nations choice of 77 grain projectiles gives you the best ballistics capable of 5.56 in a semi-automatic AR15 platform. The 77 grain bullet is more aerodynamic in flight than M193 55 grain and the 62 grain M855 and is the loading of choice for shooters who want to shoot across the course in CMP and High Power competitions with one loading. While I don’t know the specifics of the details surrounding your new projectile, the equivalent load used by the Americans in both military and civilian competition is the Mk262 and it is a popular choice for DMR type roles and precision shooting. With a 406 mm chrome lined, free floating barrel and quality 77 grain ammunition, you should expect 38-50 mm groupings at 100 meters.  Overall the weapon system is incredibly versatile, and you should have no issue converting the CQB16 to a designated marksman’s rifle by just adding quality optics and a nice trigger… with little more necessary than that. The drum adjustable sights are calibrated in meters and feature a large aperture for low light and 0-200 meter shooting, and a small aperture which is calibrated to 300 meters. From the small aperture, the drum assembly can then be rotated to the appropriate range in 1/2 minute increments out to 600 meters. The LMT drum sight assembly Thanks for stopping by Curious Kiwis. I suspect most are civilians, but hopefully this illuminates on some of the features military members will find in their hands come 2016. Any questions? Ask away! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

For years, my wife and I had a pretty simple arrangement in the case of a home invasion. We’d both grab our guns and flashlights from the nightstand, dial the police, and stay put. But then, we moved out of our apartment and bought a house.